radio stories

 
Apple's recent decision to erase the DVD/CD drive from its laptops is perhaps the clearest signal that the era of music CDs is largely over. But USB sticks and iTunes downloads have proven to be unwieldy and hard to manage, so it's no surprise that a new rumor claims Apple is working on a streaming music radio service.
 
Being in the business of selling an AM/FM radio in 2012 is not a position many companies want to be in. Considering the myriad of digital radio options such as Last.fm, Pandora and Spotify that can be streamed from smartphones, tablets and PCs to any Bluetooth speaker, who is seriously going to drop any major cash on an old-fashioned analog radio? If your company is Tivoli, makers of some of the world's finest and most attractive radios, you might beg to differ. This year, two of its most popular radios finally get Bluetooth upgrades, and the company enjoyed two firsts: a Tivoli Radio app with 100 stations and a pair of noise-canceling headphones that carry the brand's signature wood finishes.
 
It's hot outside. You'd love to go swimming. But you have no pool, the public pools are disgusting, the beach is too far away, and you can't afford a private club. What do you do? Get the government to force your neighbor to build a pool, of course. That's what it looks as if the record industry is doing and, by extension, radio broadcasters. The two industries have combined to propose an FM radio be built into every cellphone.
 
Japan's purveyor of odd electronic curios, Thanko, has released what it claims is the first USB shortwave radio. The device also picks up AM and FM radio and allows you to simply plug into your computer (after installing the appropriate...

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