brains stories

 
Memories are a tricky thing. They can be full of joy or full of fear. It's those crappy, fearful, bad ones — like remembering getting bitten by a dog, for example — that we all wish we could get rid of. That soon could be a reality as scientists experimenting with memory have developed a technique to stop fearful memories from forming.
 
In these days of artisinal cheeses, environmentally-friendly yoga mats, and mainstream TV shows like Weeds, cannabis smoking has, for some, become yet another symbol of a healthy lifestyle. But according to a new study, the substance could impact your chances of becoming the next Einstein.
 
Even among those of us who aren't fluent in geek speak, most are at least casually familiar with the concepts of software and hardware: the digital ghost and the shell. But there is a third computer component without which the other two would be meaningless. We're talking about meatware,* or the tech that connects computers to the meaty organic components, aka you. Today, we access the digital world various types of user interfaces (or a UI): keyboards, touchscreens, Kinect; anything that facilitates information transfer between flesh and silicon. And this tech works well enough. However, compared to the connectivity within a computer or within the brain, contemporary UIs are little more than annoying speed bumps along the road to the Matrix. But fear not, future human batteries in training! Researchers from around the world are hard at work developing ways to mainline the virtual world directly into your brain. No middle man required. Here we present some of the coolest upcoming technology that will collapse the divide between meat and machine.
 
Scientists preserve brains or body parts for various reasons. Sometimes the person had an illness that bears further study with more advanced tools than an age supplies; other times the brain in question powered an extraordinary intellect. The brains we'll be talking about belong more to the former, and scientists have found that studying canned gray matter can provide a history of human mental health.

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