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Travis Andrews

Travis M. Andrews is a journalist based in Washington, D.C., and New Orleans. He has written for Time, The Atlantic, Salon, Washingtonian Magazine and The Times-Picayune. He's a regular arts contributor for The Washington Post Express. When he was younger, he wrote on his mother's walls. She was displeased. For more about Travis, please visit www.travismandrews.com.

You can also follow Travis on Twitter @travismandrews. 

 
Television is one place where the forward motion of technology is consistently evident. Unfortunately, this doesn't mean all of that forward motion is always useful. Smart TVs, which connect to the Internet and come with a litany of various applications, are one place that things aren't quite panning out. Turns out, people don't want Facebook and other apps on their TVs.
 
The Internet has given us many great things, such as the ability to take fraud to entirely new levels. Well, the music industry isn't blind to this fact. YouTube recently discovered the big three, Universal, Sony/BMG and RCA, have been adding false video views to their particular artists' videos.
 
So there's this pretty small company that you've probably never heard of. It's called Google, and back in the day, you'd use it to find stuff on the Internet. Google has obviously expanded since then, becoming an all-encompassing Internet giant, and it's finally taking a leap offline with Conversions API.
 
Taylor Binns never planned to experience a simple delight of the world again: seeing it. The world was slowly going black, and time was running out. So he took his only options: a new procedure using stem cells. What we all take for granted became his gift: he could see again.
 
As we move out of the dark ages of simple computing devices and cellphones without Facebook on them, we see our science fiction dreams coming true in everyday life. The question becomes, at that point, what is real and what remains fiction. After looking around, the answers range from exciting to impressive to downright weird. Nonetheless, there's something sci-fi for everyone here, from the guy who likes to camp to the gal who likes to eat s'mores without going outside. There's an impressive amount of futuristic alarm clocks out there, too. Apparently, waking up will be the biggest challenge as we dive deeper into this millennium. We've compiled this list of science-fictiony gadgets to help you find the perfect gift for the tech nerds on your life. This is the stuff of the future!
 
Sometimes, when it comes to technology, it feels like there's no advancement unless something mind-blowingly new and complex is involved. Uniqueness holds a high value in this field, but sometimes the oldest, simplest ideas can be the most effective. Take PlicPad, for example. It's just a notebook.
 
The holidays tend to sneak up on most of us, which is interesting given the proliferation of holiday-themed stuff that surrounds us this time of year. Nonetheless, we'd be remiss to pretend like it doesn't. It most noticeably sneaks up on our bank accounts, as we scramble to get everyone from our boss to our brother the perfect gift. This year, though, why not take advantage of the whole DIY craze that's taking our country by storm. Instead of buying a gift, just print one. Heck, if that's not what 3D printers are for, then I've haven't the slightest idea why we've got them.

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