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Evan Ackerman

administrator, editor, writer

Evan Ackerman is a native Oregonian who now lives, somewhat unwillingly, in San Francisco. He has a background in creative writing and astrogeology, neither of which are necessarily appropriate for someone who is now a full-time blogger. Evan also writes for IEEE Spectrum's robotics blog, and when he's not parked at his computer with his eyes glazed over, you can find him getting injured on a soccer field or playing bagpipes excellently.

 
This Game Boy and its obligatory Tetris cartridge were taken aboard the Mir space station by cosmonaut Aleksandr A. Serebrov in 1993. It stayed in space for nearly 200 days, and was no doubt responsible for many lost hours of productivity. Now, it can be yours, along with a bunch of other cool stuff that's being auctioned off in New York on Thursday.
 
For $150 million, you could take 750 trips to space with Virgin Galactic. Or you could take five separate trips to the ISS and do a spacewalk on each one. Or, you could spend it all in one go, and join the elite group of humans, only 24 in all, who have traveled around the moon.
 
The primary reason why you can take better pictures with a DSLR than with your iPhone isn't the sensor, it's the lens. This concept camera keeps all that sexy DSLR glass, and then makes the rest of the camera into something that's iPhone-sized and detachable, even while you're taking pics.
 
30 years ago today, Xerox launched what's generally considered to be the world's first commercially available computer mouse. Arguably, the mouse ushered in the era of personal computing, since it made it easy and intuitive for people without computer experience to click around and get stuff done. That 30 year old mouse is very different from what we're used to nowadays, though, and here's a look back at how mousing technology has evolved, from bowling balls of the past to mind control of the future.
 
The Chernobyl #4 reactor has been sort of contained by a leaky and unstable "sarcophagus" since shortly after its meltdown 25 years ago today. As a more permanent solution to the problem, an international effort will place a gigantic steel arch over the site to seal it off, with three robot cranes inside to help clean up the mess.

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