Samsung's new 'Ultrabook' with DVD is too fat to be an Ultrabook

Somebody want to tell me how Samsung's new Series 5 laptop got Intel's "Ultrabook" stamp of approval? The new 14-inch laptop is still thin at 20.9mm and somehow manages to cram an optical disc drive into its side, but it's already breaking the definition of "Ultrabook."

Unless Intel's changed the definition of an Ultrabook, Sammy's new 14-inch laptop doesn't make the cut.

Intel's definition says that Ultrabooks can't be thicker than 20mm. The 14-inch Series 5 is 20.9mm.

Intel's definition says that Ultrabooks can't have an optical disc drive. The 14-inch Series 5 has an optical disc drive.

Intel's definition says that Ultrabooks can't have discrete graphic chips — only Intel's Integrated Graphics. The 14-inch Series 5 has AMD Radeon HD 7550 GPUs.

Intel's definition says that Ultrabooks must use flash-based Solid State Disks (SSD). The 14-inch Series 5 has a 1TB hard drive.

The point I'm trying to drive home is, why bother creating a category so distinctively called "Ultrabooks" that cannot exceed certain parameters, but then allow Samsung to break them?

Isn't Samsung's Series 5 laptop simply just a regular laptop that just happens to be thin? Like a Dell Adamo or a Voodoo Envy 133?

The point of an Ultrabook is to ditch the optical disc drive and slow hard drive in order to get long battery life and instant-on performance. Like MacBook Airs, Ultrabooks are powerful enough to do "real" work without weighing your bag down.

I've no doubt that Samsung's Series 5 14-inch laptop is thin and light, but by definition, it's not an Ultrabook, unless the term is simply just a new name for "notebook computer" or "laptop" or worse, a cover-up name for "PC."

Samsung Korea (Korean), via The Verge

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