'Earthscraper' concept hides a 1,000-foot skyscraper underground

The folks over at Mexican architecture group BNKR Arquitectura call this thing an "earthscraper," and the reason why should be obvious: it's a monstrous, beautiful, 65-story inverted skyscraper that hides a mini city underground.

Designed to be built smack-dab in the center of Mexico City, BNKR's Earthscraper wouldn't ruin the skyline there (though, really, who would object to something that looks like this?) and is designed in such a way that it would incorporate Mexico's history in its design. The top ten floors — which, here, would be the "bottom" ten — is a museum and cultural center dedicated to the Aztecs. Below that you've got retail space, then apartments and finally, deep underground, businesses. Because, you know, that's where business do their best work. It all terminates some 300 meters below the surface.

Our favorite detail: the interior of the structure is actually hollowed out, and there are bridges that extend out into the center of it so you can look down. Think the Grand Canyon's Skywalk.

We've got plenty more for you down in the gallery below, but this gorgeous cross-section deserves its own spot, and will let you see how the structure breaks down by the floor:

Earthscraper-by-BNKR-02.jpg

Click to enlarge

BNKR Arquitectura, via ArchDaily, via Humans Invent

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