65,000 CDs hand-sewn together to create metallic 'sea dunes'

French artist Elise Morin and architect Clémence Eliard hand sewed 65,000 old CDs and laid them out on inflatable mounds to create a sea of discs. The purpose? To "reveal the precious aspect of a small daily object."

The art exhibit is called "Wastelandscape" and is located in Paris. The point is to transform the seemingly mundane objects that we take for granted into monumental "sculptures" as they reach the end of their life.

The 65,000 CDs look like a metallic sea dune right now, but as Wastelandscape travels through different exhibitions, it'll be adapted and morphed into new art pieces and eventually recycled into polycarbonate.

As digital downloads proliferate through app stores and online services, physical media will become extinct. We can't imagine what this French pair will do with flash drives in the future. Those too will become relics of the past, once consumers go all digital.

In the meantime, take a look at the shininess of CDs. Do you even use them anymore? When was the last time you actually listened to a CD album?

WasteLandscape and Dezeen, via MyModernMet

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