MIT develops a camera that can see around walls

Well, this is nuts: engineers at MIT have developed a camera that can capture images of things not in its field of view. Yes, it's a camera that can see around corners, no mirrors involved.

How does it do it?

It has an incredibly high shutterspeed - up to one quadrillionth of a second. It emits a burst of light, then opens for a femtosecond, and counts the number of photons it gets back. It then emits another burst of light, then opens for a bit longer. This will increase the number of photons it gets back, and it will record these newcomers as having come from an object behind the first wave of photons. The process will be repeated until the entire room has been mapped. The first burst of photons will come from R2, the second burst will come from you, and the last, largest number of photons will come from the wall behind you. The camera will have 'mapped' the room.
As of now, the images it sends back are pretty fuzzy, but they're working on sharpening them up. It has all sorts of obvious practical uses, not the least of which being the ability to spy on someone in a locker room. I'm just sayin'!

Physorg via io9

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