U.S. Navy successfully turns seawater into fuel for ships and planes

Credit: Wikimedia

Railguns aren't the only thing the U.S. Navy is bragging about this week. Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. announced they have successfully turned seawater into fuel.

When your car runs out of gas, you find a gas station and fill it up. For ships and planes, however, there aren't any stations out in the middle of the ocean. Instead, the Navy's vessels are refueled by oil tankers that come to them.

All of that will change in the future. By extracting carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas simultaneously from seawater, and then using a catalytic converter, scientists created fuel that looks and smells pretty much the same as regular ol' petroleum-based fuel.

The advantages of seawater-based fuel is twofold. First, the ships don't need to be redesigned in order to use the new seawater-based fuel since it's basically the same. Second, the ability to create fuel from all that water around aircraft carriers means less dependence on oil. The U.S. Navy envisions ships will be able to create their own fuel for themselves and for planes. So long oil tankers!

"Game-changing" as the breakthrough is, the U.S. Navy says ships that generate their own fuel from seawater aren't going to start sailing the seas anytime soon — they're at least ten years away. For now, the U.S. Navy's scientists are focusing on how to produce larger quantities of seawater-based fuel.

AFP, via Digital Journal

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