Scientists track fish with a 3D-printed tag

Scientists at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) are using 3D printers, a favorite around here, to help track fish more effectively.

CSIRO's new titanium tags are made in Melbourne and are then shipped to Tasmania where they are used to monitor the behavior of large species like swordfish, marlin and tuna. This design is great because they are more durable than previous versions, non-corrosive and non-toxic to the fish.

Here's John Barnes from CSIRO, who heads up research in titanium technologies:

Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible,"

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp
Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible,"

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp
Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible,"

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp
"Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible,

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp
"Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible,

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp

"Our early trials showed that the textured surface worked well in improving retention of the tag, but we need to fine-tune the design of the tag tip to make sure that it pierces the fish skin as easily as possible. The fast turnaround speeds up the design process — it’s very easy to incorporate amendments to designs. 3D printing enables very fast testing of new product designs, which is why it’s so attractive to manufacturers wanting to trial new products."

Hip joints and other medical implants are made with biocompatible titanium with a rough surface that speeds up healing. Hopefully, this will help optimize CSIRO's research opportunities by making it more difficult for the implant to fall out.

Scientists from a number of agencies, including CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, use fish tags to track movements of individual marine species and increase understanding of their behavior. Tracks of selected marine animals tagged by CSIRO and partner agencies can be viewed on the CSIRO Ocean Tracks website. Medical implants such as dental implants and hip joints are made of biocompatible titanium with a surface texturing which speeds healing and tissue attachment after implantation. Scientists hope that a similar rough surface will help the tag to stay in fish longer.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-scientists-d-track-big-fish.html#jCp

Physorg, via Inhabitat

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